How to Stop a Dog Shedding

By on September 30, 2015

Dog shedding is a real problem in my home. Up until last year I had a dark furred dog and a light furred dog, and cream carpets. Now, I have three dark furred dogs, and cream carpets. For as many years as I can remember, I've experienced a seasonal shedding problem that, for alternate weeks, sees my home covered in light dog hairs and then dark dog hairs, now it's just dark which covers the carpets throughout.

It's devastating and even with a pretty good vaccum cleaner the work is endless. I spot tumbleweeds of dog hairs floating around every few hours and I quite comfortably could scream while thinking 'why did I bother, I should have sat on the sofa and caught up on the soaps', says Kim O'Meara.

Further, I'm a person who likes dark clothes yet my clothing still gets the full brunt of this shedding problem. I go out and notice hairs sticking to jumpers, jeans, jackets - even the seats of the car. The dogs get brushed regularly with a supposedly non shedding dog brush, but it has little effect. So what is the solution to the perennial shedding problem?

Is It Actually Possible to Stop a Dog From Shedding?

In all likelihood, stopping a dog from shedding its fur as the seasons change is probably best tackled from a management point of view rather than from the assumption that shedding can be completely stopped, particularly in long haired dog breeds.

However, a shedding dog really can cause untold extra work around the home so let's examine some of the tips to reduce the volume of fur shed as well as some management tips on dealing with shed fur on furniture, clothes etc.

How to stop a dog shedding

13 Ways To Keep Yourself Free Of Dog Shedding Misery

Do you arrive at the office looking like you rolled over with your dog? Do your dinner guests politely pick dog hair from their food before eating it? Nothing says "I have a dog" more than hair clinging to our clothing, hair wafting through the air in our homes, or hair burrowing into the butter.

Frequent vacuuming is one of the best ways to cut down on hair buildup, but if you don't always have time to drag out the vacuum cleaner, try some of these quick and dirty suggestions for cleaning up the piles of pet hair.

1. To sweep up loose dog hair from hardwood or vinyl floors, use a dampened mop.

2. Wall-to-wall carpeting holds down the hair more than hard-wood or vinyl floors, so adding a carpet to a room may help keep dog hair from wafting through your house.

3. To pick up loose dog hair that is attached to upholstered furniture, wear a dampened rubber glove or use a damp sponge.

4. Use a sticky roller to lift dog hair from fabrics and upholstery. Washable sticky rollers enable you to recycle instead of dispose of the product.

5. Purchase a washable Furniture Magnet Pet Hair Remover to help you wipe off the dog hair from clothing, furniture, or pillows. Place it under your furniture cushions for easy access.

6. To pick up dog hair from your carpet, use a window squeegee.

7. Choose furniture made from smooth fabrics such as leather, faux leather, or other fabric to which loose hair won't stick as readily.

8. Place a washable towel or blanket over your dog's favorite sleeping spot to keep hair from clinging to cushions.

9. Use washable window coverings if your dog likes to watch the world go by from the floor in front of a picture window or patio doors.

10. Draperies made of smooth fabrics won't attract as much hair as heavy textured ones, so if you're in the market for some new window furnishings, purchase ones that are less likely to become filled with your dog's hair.

11. Keep a lint brush near your favorite easy chair. Then, after your dog sits on your lap, you can roll off the hair before you get up.

12. Use a feather duster or device to clean between slats of mini-blinds to remove deposited hair.

13. Change the furnace and air conditioner filters more often during shedding season to prevent blockage.

Take a look at this hypoallergenic dog shampoo we've found...

Johnson’s Sensitive Hypoallergenic Shampoo

The latest addition to Johnson’s range of products to help keep pets coats healthy, clean and beautiful is the super premium Sensitive Hypoallergenic Shampoo. This shampoo is extra mild and has been specially developed to be suitable for dogs with sensitive skin. Suitable for all breeds, it has a balanced PH, aids relief from allergies and cleanses effectively, leaving your dog's coat fresh and clean.

Johnson’s shampoos, grooming aids, and coat and skin preparations are among the most popular products sold by pet stores and are all of high quality to be kind and gentle to coat and skin. As with all Johnson’s products they have been developed without cruelty to animals.

Johnson’s full range can be found across the country in Pet Stores, Garden Centres and from all major wholesalers. For further details and information, email info@johnsons-vet.com or visit www.johnsons-vet.com.

Priced from £3.79 RRP (200ml)

Find Out More

What About Non Shedding Dog Breeds?

The following breeds of dogs are often referred to as 'hypoallergenic dog breeds'.

Sadly, the hypoallergenic dog is a myth.

However, these breeds are certainly more compatible for people who want a dog that sheds less than, say, an Old English Sheepdog.

  • Irish Water Spaniel
  • Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
  • Bedlington Terrier

For those looking for a low shedding dog breed that is larger than these breeds, the Irish Water Spaniel may be the dog for you. These dogs have very short, almost human-like hair that will shed less and therefore doesn't leave as many allergens around the home (allergies tend to come from the skin cells, so the less hair shed, the less an dog allergy sufferer will be exposed - but don't assume ANY breed is completely free of allergy.)

The coats of these dogs must be maintained through grooming every few months. The Irish Water Spaniel is a friendly dog that likes to exercise and swim during the warmer months of the year.

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is available in four varieties, the Traditional Irish, Heavy Irish, English, and American. The main difference is the size of the dog. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier has a short coat that does not shed much during the day. The dogs will need to be groomed as often as other shorthaired breeds in order to prevent clumping or rashes on their skin.

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is characterised as being friendly and will always welcome strangers. They enjoy getting their exercise and want to be around people as much as possible. These dogs should not be kept in an apartment. Having a backyard ideas is a must as this dog loves to run and bark.

Bedlington Terriers are smaller than the Irish Water Spaniel and Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, but they have short coats which need to be brushed a few times a week to prevent tangling. They will also need to be groomed every three or four months in order to maintain a healthy coat. These dogs are energetic and enjoy exercise. For those who are interested in low shedding dog breeds and who live in apartment buildings or smaller homes, this dog is perfect.

bedlington terrier photo
Photo Credit: Llima

A Question About Dog Shedding

Question: My dog is shedding too much hair, it's a problem. What can I do?

“I have always taken great pains with the care and grooming of my Siberian Husky, making sure that he is immaculate at all times. But when I brushed him today though, I got two full buckets of hair. I know dogs are supposed to shed, but never have I seen anything like this. He actually looks bald! Can you tell me why?”

Answer:

As they say in life, you can overdo any good thing. If you keep him “immaculate at all times” then I would assume that his diet is also the very best, probably supplemented with vitamins and minerals that his system really doesn't need.

This happens all too often. Owners who have nothing but good intentions run out and try to do everything possible to make sure their dogs and puppies are in good health. They buy all of the supplements, they attempt dog training from every angle possible, and they just plain go overboard on care - often mentally or emotionally debilitating the animal is some way.

But I digress - about the shedding issue, these types of haircoat problems can usually be traced to one of the following three causes:

1) Parasites
2) Dietary deficiencies
3) Hormonal imbalances

Only a veterinarian can properly diagnose which of these three things may be causing your dog's problem. Schedule an appointment immediately and be sure to write a detailed list of all supplements and food intake that your dog has had over the last several months.

The importance of diet in relation to shedding problems in dogs can't be overstated. In fact, ensuring your dog is being fed the correct diet has a bearing on everything from their weight, general health and vitality and even the way they behave.

Conclusion: Can I Stop a Dog Shedding?

No, it's not possible to totally stop a dog shedding. But you can certainly take action steps to reduce shedding in dogs, to manage the shed hairs around the home and on clothing and, if you are looking to acquire a dog, you can certainly choose low shedding dog breeds rather than pick a dog that is likely to shed significant amounts of hair even if you take all of the above action steps.

Would you like more in depth tips on caring for your dog's coat?

Subscribe to Total Dog Grooming Magazine - (FREE for a limited time!)

Comments

comments

About Kim O'Meara

22 Comments

  1. Orlando

    April 4, 2011 at 10:47 am

    My dog tends to shed more when the season changes. I find that shedding is reduced by bathing the dog and brushing at least once a day. As far as keeping the home hair free I vacuum every 2 days.

  2. fred rembert

    August 24, 2011 at 2:34 pm

    All dogs shed, some more than others. These suggestions are great! Another is DoggyHairNets – they control shedding dog hair. Really. And they look great!

  3. Tana

    January 12, 2012 at 4:27 pm

    Where do I find a DoggyHairNet for a 55lb Australian Cattle Dog (blue heeler)? And is there a pill you can give a dog to keep them from shedding so much?

  4. Becky

    January 23, 2012 at 11:31 am

    Tana, I have a shepard mix that never stops shedding, I seriously dont know how she isnt bald. If you find a pill please let me know. my dog is huge too so its a mess

  5. Jess

    February 23, 2012 at 1:43 am

    I have a 10 month old pure bred golden retriever and i give her a trim every time she looks like she needs it, makes her less warm and she sheds way less!

    • mike

      January 5, 2013 at 7:35 pm

      IHAVE TWO GOLDEN RETRIEVERS THEY BOTU SHED i DON,T SHAVE THEM IT THEY WOULD ONLY SHED SMALL HAIR FIND A GOOD BRUSH TRIM THE HAIR ON THEIR FEET DOGS SHED LESS IF THEY STAY OUTSIDE

  6. Eveline

    April 20, 2012 at 9:12 pm

    I have been ordering some gravy type food supplement -ShedNoMore- for about $20 a bottle, convinced that it was helping. I’ve been out for a few days and the shed hair volume has cranked up considerably. Does anyone else have info on this stuff? Could the extra omega oils it contains cause problems (too much fat in their diet?) Before I order more, am I delusional or can you only hold it off so long before the dogs simply must shed or, being spring in the south, is this seasonal?

  7. JO

    April 26, 2012 at 4:18 pm

    I heard a long time ago that cottage cheese is good to reduce shedding but have not found any remarks on it lately. I know dogs are not to have MILK, but what about the cheeses etc we feed them. I have Pomeranians and one sheds badly. The other is a blow her coat once a year then she is done. Now you tell me.

  8. Colton k.

    June 13, 2012 at 3:34 pm

    I am sure you have all heard of the ionizer. It is a product that charges the the air with positive ions. Well I am working on a baseboard version, also has a gentle current, which eases the hairs along the side where a modified dryer lint catcher accumulates the hairs. Simply empty when full. The hairs become mildly charged and usher them selves to a negative anode along the baseboards. The only thing is it hasn’t been invented yet. But if your are savvy, there you go. Make one. I got the idea from my fire engine at work that has one in the plumbing system to accumulate mineral deposits and it works real good. If it works in water it should work great with dog hair. Plus… I have a Siberian husky and it never stops coming…

  9. Gracy Ralte

    July 16, 2012 at 12:46 am

    I have a pomeranian and i had a great problem. He sheds so badly that after wiping all the tables, chairs and bookshelf they come flying and settled on all the furnitures i just clean like within a minute.I really need an effective suggestion

  10. lisa

    July 19, 2012 at 3:53 pm

    I would like to know will the hair just keep coming out? I keep brushing and brushing and it keeps coming and coming, I figured I would know when i was done when it stopped, but it doesn’t stop, should i keep brushing?

  11. Quincy Evans

    July 21, 2012 at 11:53 pm

    I have golden retrievers and chihuahua’s. When the Golden Retrievers shed it is way worse than the little dogs, but it only happens a couple times a year. The chihuahuas on the other hand…shed constantly! I think long haired dogs are less likely to be a constant shedder than short haired dogs.

  12. Di

    October 26, 2012 at 11:44 am

    I have a long haired chihuahua he sheds constantly all year round total knightmare he is a stunning little dog but the only way to cope with the constant hairy floors furniture clothes etc is to clip his hair off so he looks like a short hair chi :-(

  13. sally baxter

    November 5, 2012 at 9:43 pm

    I have a German shepherd boxer mix he is 8 months old and weights about 40lbs, he sheds to the point that I could make two of him. I brush him and it’s still as bad. Is there anything I can do to reduce this? Or is it just going to get worse as he grows.

  14. Sherena

    March 13, 2013 at 10:49 pm

    My dog has clumps of hair falling off of him; and this is everyday. Can someone please tell me what should i do

    • Deb

      April 8, 2013 at 5:03 pm

      Hi I think your dog may have a dietry or hormonal imbalance or some sort of parasite I am not a vet, its just what I have read, you need to take him to the vet as this won’t get better on it’s own.

  15. nicole

    May 13, 2013 at 5:23 am

    I groom dogs. I suggest brushing out the coat really good till you get little to no shed hair then bathe the dog with a good quality deshedding shampoo like the furminator shampoo. Wash the dog with really warm water this will help open the pore and release the remaining under coat that wasnt picked up by the brush. I alway wash a double coated breed twice and condition once just help get most of the coat out. Next get out the blow dryer and put it on cool or warm never hot the hot setting can damage or burn the skin causing a worse shedding problem. Now brush and blowdry at the same time this will get the rest of that remaining undercoat out of there.it is good to do this ever 3 to 4 weeks. Aleave in conditioner also tends to help after each brushing which you should do atleast every other day. Hope this helps.

  16. Jacquie

    July 13, 2014 at 8:33 am

    I do like the article and some of the comments, but the bottom line on this is: understand your dog’s coat the way it changes through a dogs life, winter summer autumn ring and circumstances food and even mood( something frightening or worrying sometimes means a dog sheds more )
    And ONE simply solution get the right brush and comb for the breed and use it at least once a week it takes me 10 minutes to give my full coated Standard poodle a really good brush and comb through no secret she never goes more than three days between grooms less time than it takes me to apply make up every day! Surely any dog should get that amount of time from their owner!

  17. Tony

    September 20, 2014 at 7:40 pm

    I don’t know what to try our Siberian Husky Probably will Fill A Bucket Full Of Hair Once A Week Easy And We Cant Find Anything To Workk

  18. Xan

    March 10, 2015 at 12:38 am

    I have (2) 150lb. American Bulldogs and they shed like crazy. I have found that basically putting them in a steam shower with water pretty warm and coconut shampoo opens up their pores, while scrubbing them with a horse grooming brush that is very gentle on their skin. They love it…they even lay down in tub and lay beside shower waiting their turn because it’s like a “spa” day for them. The longer I let them steam…clumps of undercoat falls off and eventually I have cups of hair blocking my drain! I also rinse them in cool water to close their pores. I also notice that this stimulates the pores to continue shedding that undercoat as the next day…they shed another pound it seems. Hope this helps. I’ve tried all shampoos and remedies…none works better than this and living in Texas…the weather throws their system off every other day and dead hair smells horrible on an inside dog! Bathing all the time is not good on your pet, it strips their skin of natural oils, so I use baby powder in between to help with odor and they let me vacuum them(:

  19. barbara rivera

    June 18, 2015 at 1:11 am

    My chaua/terrier sheds like no tomorrow all the time. Have used.everything possible. My vet says there is nothing i can do. He. Muust be wrong or just don’t know. She has ruined my car. HELp!!

  20. Katie

    October 6, 2015 at 3:10 pm

    For most dogs, it might be a case of brushing them regularly, to get rid of loose hairs, as you would with a cat. Sometimes diet or health issues might be a reason for shedding – however, some great tips for us humans!

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